Online Book Club: The Last Days of Night, part 1 3


It’s time to kick off the online book club for The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore. For today’s questions, please only discuss parts from Chapters 1-36. If you have finished the book already, please don’t give out any spoilers. We’ll discuss the entire book on Wednesday, Feb. 22.

You can discuss the questions in the comments section below on the blog or join us on Facebook.

Thanks for joining us! I’ll post details about March’s book next week!

Please only comment up to the end of Chapter 36.

  1. Did you know much about Edison or Westinghouse before reading this book? If not, what are your impressions of these two men? If so, have your impressions of them changed?
  2. This is a book of historical fiction (the author highlights what is factual in the back of the book). What is something about history you learned from the book?
  3. Contrast Tesla’s motivations to Edison’s and Westinghouse’s.
  4. Do you think Paul will succeed in the lawsuit against Edison?
  5. Do you think the fire was accidental or set on purpose by Edison?
  6. Why is the search for power such a powerful drive for some people? And not for others?
  7. Do you like Agnes? What are your thoughts on her relationship with her mother?

Thank you for reading with us and stopping by to discuss The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore!


About Sarah Anne Carter

Sarah Anne Carter is a writer and reader. She grew up all over the world as a military brat and is now putting down roots with her family in Ohio. Family life keeps her busy, but any spare moment is spent reading, writing or thinking about plots for novels.


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3 thoughts on “
Online Book Club: The Last Days of Night, part 1”

  • Brenda Carlson

    Did you know much about Edison or Westinghouse before reading this book? If not, what are your impressions of these two men? If so, have your impressions of them changed? I have not known much more than that Edison was an inventor (of the light bulb and other technologies) and that Westinghouse was a manufacturer. I had no idea Edison was among the wealthy or that either of them were as hostile to one another as portrayed in this book. Just learning about Westinghouse; learning about a side of Edison that tarnishes my long-held view of him!
    This is a book of historical fiction (the author highlights what is factual in the back of the book). What is something about history you learned from the book? Thank you for pointing out the info in the back of the book, that was helpful. The power of media was then, and is now, used to sway public opinion. High society is always fascinating.
    Contrast Tesla’s motivations to Edison’s and Westinghouse’s. Tesla was imagining and creating because that was who he was. Edison wanted to know what would NOT work in order to find solutions and figure it out first. Westinghouse wanted to make lots of lots of things available to everyone.
    Do you think Paul will succeed in the lawsuit against Edison? Now that we’ve met Harold Brown and seen his tactics to sway public opinion, I’m not so sure!
    Do you think the fire was accidental or set on purpose by Edison? It appears to be arson. I’m not convinced that it was masterminded by Edison, though. (Maybe because I want to continue thinking of him as an amazing inventor in the history of America!)
    Why is the search for power such a powerful drive for some people? And not for others? I read a book once called “Money, Sex and Power.” The book described these as three of the most compelling motivators in the human race. The quotes, and their authors, at the beginning of each chapter are very telling, including the one attributed to Edison, “I do not care so much for a great fortune as I do for getting ahead of the other fellows.”
    Do you like Agnes? What are your thoughts on her relationship with her mother? I feel like the relationship between Agnes and her mother has left Agnes less than a whole person, as inauthentic. I don’t like the mother. I want to like Agnes, but am holding her at arm’s length so far.