Online Book Club: The Truth According to Us, Part 2 2


So, what did you think? Did you like the book? Would you recommend it? Or do you think people should pass on reading it?

You can discuss the questions in the comments section below on the blog or join us on Facebook.

Thanks for joining us!

February’s book is The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore. Join us for discussions on Feb. 8 and 22.

  1. What did you predict would happen and were you right?
  2. In the end, do you feel the same way about Felix?
  3. Do you find Willa’s character believable? Why or why not?
  4. Both Layla and Jottie grow as women in the book. Do you like how they changed?
  5. Once a lie has gone on for so long, is it better for the truth to come out or should things be left as is?
  6. At the end of the book, do you feel the letters add to the book or distract?
  7. Did you like the book? Would you recommend it? Or do you think people should pass on reading it?
  8. Any other thoughts on topics I didn’t ask about?

About Sarah Anne Carter

Sarah Anne Carter is a writer and reader. She grew up all over the world as a military brat and is now putting down roots with her family in Ohio. Family life keeps her busy, but any spare moment is spent reading, writing or thinking about plots for novels.


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2 thoughts on “
Online Book Club: The Truth According to Us, Part 2”

  • Brenda Carlson

    What did you predict would happen and were you right? I couldn’t really predict the ending through the entire book – maybe that’s what kept me reading.
    In the end, do you feel the same way about Felix? Yup – still didn’t trust him.
    Do you find Willa’s character believable? Why or why not? She shifted frequently between child and woman. Maybe it was her age. Not sure a youngster would have the kinds of insights and questions she did. Her bout with depression was interesting, too.
    Both Layla and Jottie grow as women in the book. Do you like how they changed? Yes
    Once a lie has gone on for so long, is it better for the truth to come out or should things be left as is? I believe the Truth always sets us free.
    At the end of the book, do you feel the letters add to the book or distract? Some of the trivia could have been left out. Some of them added dimension to Layla’s character and her assignment.
    Did you like the book? Would you recommend it? Or do you think people should pass on reading it?
    Any other thoughts on topics I didn’t ask about? Your question about Truth begins to get at my thoughts – The author seems to be advocating – or at least exposing – how history is viewed and perhaps revised according to current thinking, which has been “informed” by gossip and folklore, to say nothing of societal changes. To me the Truth is the Truth and what happened in history is what happened, no matter what I/we think. All in all, a knotty topic to broach in a novel.

    • Sarah Anne Carter Post author

      I agree that Truth is Truth, but it does make you wonder what “lies” have become what we consider true history. I think it might have been a little better with Willa being a little older and only changing character viewpoints with chapter breaks. Then the letters may not have been needed, but she still could have included the excerpts from the book that was being written about the town.