Sarah Anne’s Bookshelf – May 2018 4


Bookshelf

I chose some very interesting books from my bookshelf in May for a total of 11 books read. I’m up to more than 50 books this year so far. In May, I read some inspirational books, very good fiction and interesting political commentary.

Here’s what I read:

Once We Were Brothers

Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson

Once We Were Brothers is a historical fiction book about a man in Chicago being identified as a Nazi as an older gentleman. The man who is accusing grew up as a brother to the accused. Readers are left guessing to the end if the man is rightly accused or not. This book was May’s Online Book Club book – if you read it, join our discussion.


Voice in the Wind

A Voice in the Wind by Francine Rivers

A Voice in the Wind is another great historical fiction read set in the Roman Empire shortly after Jesus’ death and resurrection. A Jewish girl is taken in slavery and realizes she must keep her beliefs in Christ very close or she could be in danger. However, she feels compelled to help the people she serves as they face their daily battles – spiritually.


Every Note Played

Every Note Played by Lisa Genova

Every Note Played is a book about facing death and finding redemption. A renowned piano player is diagnosed with ALS and the only person willing to take care of him as he gets paralyzed bit by bit is his ex-wife. They didn’t end on amicable terms, but find each other seeing how they were each responsible for their downfall.


Still Me

Still Me by JoJo Moyes

Still Me is the third book in the series featuring Louisa Clark. She is finally getting out on her own after grieving over Will and finds herself with a job across the ocean in New York City. As the distance between her family and boyfriend grows, Louisa must chose what is really important to her.


The Forgotten Road

The Forgotten Road by Richard Paul Evans

The Forgotten Road is the second book in Evans’ The Broken Road series. Charles James starts his walk across the country along Route 66 to try to find absolution from his ex-wife, whom he didn’t love as he should. This book mainly focuses on the walk and what James sees along the way.


Boundaries

Boundaries by Dr. Henry Townsend and Dr. 

Boundaries is a good read for any adult. It is helpful in putting sanity into any and all relationships, whether with coworkers, spouses, children, parents or friends. It gives practical tools and examples to guard your life while loving others.


Artemis Fowl

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

Artemis Fowl is the first book in a  young adult series. It was interesting, but left me with some questions at the end (which made me read the second book shortly thereafter). Artemis is only 12, but is cunning and finds a way to reach the fairy world to kidnap a leprechaun for ransom. He is already known as a criminal mastermind, yet he deeply cares for his mother and won’t give up hope that his missing father will be found alive.


Win Bigly

Win Bigly by Scott Adams

Win Bigly is a book about politics that is not political. Yes, that is possible. Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, shows how and why Donald Trump was the more persuasive character in the election, which led to his winning. I learned many interesting tidbits in this book. Watch out – you’ll know some of the secrets of persuasion if you read it.


Good Enough is Good Enough

Good Enough is Good Enough by Colleen Duggan

Good Enough is Good Enough is a book geared toward mothers who feel they have to meet certain expectations to be a good mother. Written from a Catholic perspective, the author explores how she came to realize she didn’t have to have it all together. In fact, sharing her honest stories will help other mothers be honest in their struggles. I read this with a mom’s group.


Practice Makes Purpose

Practice Makes Purpose by C. Paul Schroeder

Practice Makes Purpose takes the idea of six core spiritual practices creating a purposeful life. The book is short, yet contains helpful tips and mantras to go along with each practice. For example, being compassionate and being a great listener are two of the practices.


Art of Fully Living

The Art of Fully Living by Tal Gur

The Art of Fully Living is like having a personal life coach in a book. Tal Gur took 100 life goals and completed them in 10 years by just going out and doing them. It’s a very inspirational book and will have you wanting to make your own list of goals to go out and finish.


What did you read in May?
Share on the blog – I’m always looking for books to add to my to-read bookshelf!


About Sarah Anne Carter

Sarah Anne Carter is a writer and reader. She grew up all over the world as a military brat and is now putting down roots with her family in Ohio. Family life keeps her busy, but any spare moment is spent reading, writing or thinking about plots for novels.

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